Our Sages

Lone Simonsen, Ph.D.
President

Lone Simonsen is the president and co-founder of Sage Analytica. She also holds an appointment as a Research Professor at the George Washington University, and as a Research Fellow with the RAPIDD infectious disease modeling network hosted by the Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Dr. Simonsen earned her PhD in population genetics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and is an expert in infectious disease epidemiology, pandemic influenza, surveillance methodology, vaccine effectiveness and vaccine adverse events. Over the past two decades she has worked at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the National Institutes of Health. She has published over 100 papers, book chapters, commentaries and letters. She serves on the editorial boards of several journals, including Epidemics, Plos Currents Influenza and Plos Medicine.

As a senior epidemiologist at NIAID she advised institute leadership on influenza, SARS, and vaccine issues, and she assisted the WHO with SARS and pandemic influenza response. She left government in 2007 to pursue a career in academia and consulting. Her current research focuses on signature features of elucidating the epidemiology of historic influenza pandemics, developing novel surveillance strategies for tracking the ongoing pandemic, modeling the burden of respiratory viruses, and evaluating benefits associated with vaccine programs, including those for influenza, pneumonia and rotavirus.

Dr. Simonsen is an active speaker on public health problems. She recently served on an expert panel on influenza for the Council of Foreign Relations in New York and advised the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology Policy on pandemic surveillance issues. Her recent academic presentations include one on influenza vaccine benefits in Beijing, another on signature features of historic influenza in Copenhagen, and a third on pandemic surveillance strategies at Harvard School of Public Health.